Category Archives for "Grammar Tips"

Grammar Tip: Insure vs. Assure vs. Ensure ~ Mainstay Editorial Services

Insure vs. Assure vs. Ensure

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Insure vs. Assure vs. Ensure While insure is fairly easy to remember, assure and ensure seem to confuse a lot of people and are often used incorrectly. Insure – verb –to provide or obtain insurance for financial protection against loss. 2. To make certain especially by taking precautions Assure – verb – 1. […]

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Grammar Tip: Who vs. Whom ~ from Mainstay Editorial Services

Who vs. Whom

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Who vs. Whom The dreaded who vs. whom debate! I am asked about this one a lot, and even I get tripped up on which one to use. While many people, including writers, believe whom will eventually fall out of use, that time has not arrived, so for now, we will continue to […]

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Grammar Tip: A Part vs. Apart ~ from Mainstay Editorial Services

A Part vs. Apart

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: A Part vs. Apart Recently, a reader reached out and suggested I write a piece on apart vs. a part. I love getting requests and suggestions for my Grammar Tips blog and am happy to oblige. Apart Used as a single word, apart has a few meanings. For one, it means to have […]

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Grammar Tip: Principal vs. Principle ~ from Mainstay Editorial Services

Principal vs. Principle

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Principal vs. Principle While you were in school, were you ever sent to the principal’s office? What about the principle’s office? Principal – adjective – most important, consequential or influential Examples: She is the principal dancer in the city’s ballet company. Chicken is the principalingredient in this casserole. Principal – noun – a […]

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Grammar Tip: Desert vs. Dessert from Mainstay Editorial Services

Desert vs. Dessert

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Desert vs. Dessert Are you about to dive into a scrumptious treat or an arid land with very little vegetation? You’ll definitely want to know the difference before taking a bite. But, I admit I had to look up the difference between these two words every time until I learned this memory trick from […]

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Grammar Tip: Loose vs. Lose from Mainstay Editorial Services

Loose vs. Lose

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Loose vs. Lose While many people use these words interchangeably, they are not the same, so let’s start this Grammar Tip by defining loose and lose. Loose – adjective – not tight fitting, not securely attached Lose – verb – a defeat, lost or missing But How Do You Remember Which One Is […]

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Grammar Tip: Everyday vs. Every Day from Mainstay Editorial Services

Everyday vs. Every Day

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Everyday vs. Every Day Can’t decide if you should use the one-word version or the two-word version of everyday? There is a difference between the two versions, and they cannot be used interchangeably. Everyday (one word) According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, everyday (one word) means used or encountered routinely. In other words, it is common […]

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Grammar Tip: Who's vs. Whose from Mainstay Editorial Services

Who’s vs. Whose

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Who’s vs. Whose These two words are frequently confused because they sound alike. However, they don’t mean the same thing, and there is an easy way to remember the difference. Who’s is a contraction for who is. Just remember the apostrophe lets us know there are letters missing. In this case, the apostrophe replaces […]

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Grammar Tips from Mainstay Editorial Services Fewer vs. Less

Fewer vs. Less

Grammar Tips

Fewer and less are adjectives that describe nouns, so to begin this grammar tip, let’s discuss nouns, specifically countable and uncountable nouns. Countable nouns are objects you can count – cups, oranges and plates. Uncountable nouns are objects you cannot count – water, air, information and courage. When determining if you should use fewer or less, […]

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Compliment vs. Complement ~ Grammar Tips from Mainstay Editorial Services

Compliment vs. Complement

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Compliment vs. Complement Yesterday, my friend complimented my shoes, or did she complement them? Do you get confused about these two words? Don’t worry, I have a tip that will help you keep them straight. According to Merriam Webster’s Dictionary, a compliment is a remark that says something good about someone or something. […]

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