Everyday vs. Every Day

Grammar Tips

Grammar Tip: Everyday vs. Every Day from Mainstay Editorial Services

Grammar Tip: Everyday vs. Every Day

Can’t decide if you should use the one-word version or the two-word version of everyday? There is a difference between the two versions, and they cannot be used interchangeably.

Everyday (one word)
According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, everyday (one word) means used or encountered routinely. In other words, it is common or ordinary. It’s an adjective and is used to modify nouns.

Example 1: Our everyday dishes are not good enough for the party.

Every Day (two words)
Every day (two words) means each day and is used when referring to things you do each day. It’s an adverb and modifies verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.

Example 2: He has practice every day.

Helpful Hint to Remember the Difference

If you can replace everyday/every day with the phrase “each day,” you need to use the two-word version – every day.

Let’s take a look at the examples again:

Example 1: Our everyday dishes are not good enough for the party.
In this case, we cannot replace everyday with each day. Our each day dishes are not good enough for the party.The sentence does not make sense, so we know we need to use the one-word version.

Example 2: He has practice every day.
In this sentence, we can replace every day with each day, and the sentence still works. He has practice each day. Because we can exchange every day and each day, we know we need to use the two-word version.

Do you have a grammar question? Let me know about it in the comments. I’ll answer your question in a future Grammar Tips post.

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